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The Role of the Gut Microbiome in Multiple Sclerosis

Gut microorganisms appear to play a role in multiple sclerosis.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease, which means it becomes worse over time.

With about 400,000 people in the United States, and about 2.5 million people around the world, living with the condition, the need to find ways to better treat and manage the disease has led scientists into a whole new realm of research: how the “gut microbiome” — the genetic material of all the critters living in our digestive tract — might open doors to new MS treatments in the future.

What Exactly Is Multiple Sclerosis?

MS is a chronic disease in which the body abnormally attacks parts of its own nervous system. It’s considered an immune-mediated disease because it involves immune system attacks. Most experts — though not all — consider it to be an autoimmune disease, meaning the immune system is reacting against a normally occurring protein as if it were a foreign protein. But the specific protein, or antigen, being attacked has not been identified in MS.

Read Full Article: The Role of the Gut Microbiome in Multiple Sclerosis

Read Full Article: The Role of the Gut Microbiome in Multiple Sclerosis

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