This Is How Hepatitis C Is Treated (and Even Cured for Good)

Could a new approach to kill cancer at nanoscale work?
April 26, 2017
7th grader wins awards for ‘remarkable’ science fair project on cancer research
April 27, 2017
Show all

This Is How Hepatitis C Is Treated (and Even Cured for Good)

Treatment options for hepatitis C have improved greatly in recent years.

Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that can lead to liver cancer, liver failure, or even death. But luckily, not only is hepatitis C treatable, it can be cured. These days, people with hepatitis C have options when it comes to their treatment, including pills that are easier to take and much more effective than injections of the past.

The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is spread through contact with infected blood, such as from shared needles or syringes (you cannot get it from casual contact with an infected person). Up to 25% of people who get the virus have an acute, or short-lived, infection that is cleared by the body without treatment. The remaining 75% to 85% of cases—up to 4 million people in the U.S.—develop chronic hepatitis C, meaning the virus lingers for six months or longer. For people with chronic hepatitis C, getting treatment as soon as possible can help shorten the lifespan of the condition and hopefully clear the infection in a matter of weeks.

“With the regimens that are out there now, there can be just one pill with few side effects and cure rates over 95%, closing in on 98% to 99%,” says Eugene Schiff, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Schiff Center for Liver Diseases at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Read full article: This Is How Hepatitis C Is Treated (and Even Cured for Good)

Read Full Article: This Is How Hepatitis C Is Treated (and Even Cured for Good)

The health and medical information on our website is not intended to take the place of advice or treatment from health care professionals. It is also not intended to substitute for the users’ relationships with their own health care/pharmaceutical providers.

Comments are closed.