Tip Sheet: Immunotherapy Trial Results for Cancer Among Research Presentations by Johns Hopkins Scientists

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Tip Sheet: Immunotherapy Trial Results for Cancer Among Research Presentations by Johns Hopkins Scientists

Combining two immunotherapy medications could be beneficial in melanoma.

Combining two checkpoint inhibitors, drugs that remove inhibitory signals and restore the immune system’s ability to fight cancer, may be effective in shrinking melanoma tumors or preventing their growth in some patients who previously received standard therapy, according to new research results from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute. (ASCO Abstract 9520).

Although currently-available immune checkpoint inhibitors have improved survival for some patients with melanoma or other types of cancer, Johns Hopkins study leader Evan J. Lipson, M.D., notes that these therapies are often ineffective. For example, in two recent studies, nivolumab (Opdivo), which targets an immune-inhibiting protein known as PD-1, led to two-year survival in only about 60 percent of patients with advanced melanoma.

In an effort to increase that percentage, Lipson and his colleagues tested whether adding a second, still experimental checkpoint inhibitor, which targets another immune-inhibiting protein known as LAG-3, could be effective in treating patients with advanced melanoma.

Read full article: Tip Sheet: Immunotherapy Trial Results for Cancer Among Research Presentations by Johns Hopkins Scientists

Read Full Article: Tip Sheet: Immunotherapy Trial Results for Cancer Among Research Presentations by Johns Hopkins Scientists

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