Tremors Linked to MS Poorly Treated with Symptomatic Medication, Study Finds

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Tremors Linked to MS Poorly Treated with Symptomatic Medication, Study Finds

Tremors associated with multiple sclerosis are poorly treated with symptomatic medication.

Disabling tremors can affect as many as half of all people with multiple sclerosis (MS), but they are inadequately treated because of limited therapeutic options and are not sufficiently being studied, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham reported.

Their report, “Symptomatic Management of Multiple Sclerosis-Associated Tremor Among Participants in the NARCOMS Registry,” was published in the International Journal of MS Care.

Patients with MS are faced with a number of disabling symptoms that affect their functional capacity and quality of life. Although recent drugs have been approved to improve some symptoms, such as gait or emotional responses, other symptoms are managed with drugs in an off-label manner, meaning the drug is not approved for such use.

An estimated 25 percent to 58 percent of MS patients experience tremor, and such tremors are moderate to severe in 15 percent of these patients. MS tremor is highly disabling, and associated with an increased likelihood of unemployment or forced retirement at an earlier age compared with other MS patients. However, few studies address the effects of medication on reducing tremor severity.

Read Full Article: Tremors Linked to MS Poorly Treated with Symptomatic Medication, Study Finds – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Read Full Article: Tremors Linked to MS Poorly Treated with Symptomatic Medication, Study Finds – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

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