What it’s like to survive cancer, by those who have done it 

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What it’s like to survive cancer, by those who have done it 

More people than ever are alive many years after a cancer diagnosis.

The chances of surviving cancer are much greater than ever before. In a study published by the charity Macmillan Cancer Support it was found that people are now twice as likely to live at least 10 years after being diagnosed than they were 35 years ago.

Five people shared with us their cancer remission stories and what they learned from the experience.

I was surprised by how accepting I was when told I had cancer in 2011. The diagnosis came only a couple of years after my father had suddenly succumbed to lung cancer. At one point I came very close to death as a consequence of leukopoenia, a reduction in the number of white cells in the blood, rather than the cancer itself. Having come so close to losing my life, I now realise life is short and nothing is certain.

My first dose of chemotherapy was dreadful. The oncologist and nurses warned me it would be, but it was still a shock. I felt hot, and nauseous and thrashed about in pain. I would’ve fallen off the bed if the nurses hadn’t been hanging on to me. However, after that one episode, ongoing chemotherapy caused me no further problems. In fact, the whole treatment programme was so well managed that eventually I just went back to work and pretty much lived normally.

I’ve been in remission since 2014 and I feel pretty good. The cancer may return one day, but I’m ready for it – I know the symptoms and I’m confident prompt treatment will see me OK once more.

Read Full Article: What it’s like to survive cancer, by those who have done it | Guardian readers and Sarah Marsh | Opinion | The Guardian

Read Full Article: What it’s like to survive cancer, by those who have done it | Guardian readers and Sarah Marsh | Opinion | The Guardian

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