When it Comes to Curing Hepatitis C, Your Health Care Provider May Not Need to Be A Specialist 

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When it Comes to Curing Hepatitis C, Your Health Care Provider May Not Need to Be A Specialist 

Hepatitis C can be treated by many different types of health care providers.

The introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has resulted in a well-tolerated treatment regimen and high rates of cure that have brought the possibility of widespread treatment and cure for patients with chronic HCV infection even closer to reality. Unfortunately, with roughly 2.7 million Americans living with HCV infection and only about 20,000 specialists (gastroenterology-hepatology and infectious disease physicians) in the United States, the current specialist workforce is not large enough to treat all the people who will need it.

A recently published study looked at whether nonspecialist healthcare providers could help meet the treatment needs of Americans with HCV. This supports one of the goals of the National Viral Hepatitis Action Plan (NVHAP), which calls for building the capacity of the health care workforce to improve access to treatment for persons infected with HCV.

Read full article: When it Comes to Curing Hepatitis C, Your Health Care Provider May Not Need to Be A Specialist | HIV.gov

Read Full Article: When it Comes to Curing Hepatitis C, Your Health Care Provider May Not Need to Be A Specialist | HIV.gov

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