Why it took me 12 years to be diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease

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Why it took me 12 years to be diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease

One woman shares her long journey to a Crohn’s diagnosis.

One of the thing that frustrates many us with IBD is the many years of struggling it takes us to reach a diagnosis.

Every 30 minutes somebody is diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis – and for many of those people, they will have been fobbed off with ‘IBS’ or ‘stress’ many times before they finally put a name to their suffering.

In my case, I lost count altogether.

It took me 12 years to be diagnosed – and here’s why. First, I was ‘stressed’ and ‘needed to eat more’

My journey with IBD began at the age of 16. During my GCSEs, I had terrible pains in my legs, mouth ulcers, anaemia and diarrhoea and my periods eventually stopped. At the time, my doctor blamed it on two things: stress and not eating enough. I never lost weight during my IBD as I have always been thin – whether in remission, in a flare-up or the years before my disease – but the doctor decided many of the symptoms were because I wasn’t eating enough food and suggested a ‘few sausage sandwiches’. Of course, the other reason is what we’ve all heard: stress. It’s very easy to link any condition to stress, especially when the patient is sitting exams. But stress didn’t account for such a vast array of symptoms, so why I was dismissed? Because I had never had bleeding and I wasn’t in agony. Even now, this is still a massive misconception that if you have IBD you’ll automatically be collapsing in agony and bleeding huge amounts – it’s just not true. We’re all different.

Read full article: Why it took me 12 years to be diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease | Metro News

Read Full Article: Why it took me 12 years to be diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease | Metro News

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