Why lung cancer is the deadliest cancer type and many patients suffer in silence

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Why lung cancer is the deadliest cancer type and many patients suffer in silence

While for years lung cancer has been one of the most deadly cancer types, it also spent years being overlooked for funding and much-needed research. The reason is its connection

If someone were to ask what the No. 1 cancer killer is, most would say breast or colon cancer.

But if the number of those deaths are combined, lung cancer still beats them by thousands every year.

And many of those diagnosed are much sicker because they have waited later to seek help because of the stigma associated with the disease.

“A lot of lung cancer patients suffer their disease quietly,” said Dr. John Wrangle, an oncologist with the Medical University of South Carolina’s Hollings Cancer Center. “It’s because of that association with lung cancer and tobacco.”

The Center for Disease Control for Prevention reports that around 200,000 people are diagnosed with lung cancer every year. And about 150,000 die from the disease.

In South Carolina, the state health department reports that the lung cancer incidence and mortality rate are both over five points higher than the national rates.

The majority of all lung cancer cases are directly associated with cigarette smoking, and campaigns against smoking are everywhere. But in building that awareness of the dangers of smoking, lung cancer patients have been shamed.

Read on: Why lung cancer is the deadliest cancer type and many patients suffer in silence

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