Younger American women more likely to get lung cancer than men

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Younger American women more likely to get lung cancer than men

Lung cancer in women, at certain ages, is on the rise.

Historically, men have been more likely to develop lung cancer than women in the United States, but new research indicates that this sex-based trend has flipped, with the greatest shift occurring among whites and some Hispanics born after the mid-1960s. Overall,younger women are now more likely to get lung cancer than men of the same age, the study authors say.

The new study, a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute, offers a mix of both positive and negative results. The research appeared Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.
“Over the past two decades, the age-specific incidence of lung cancer has generally decreased among both men and women 30 to 54 years of age in all races and ethnic groups,” the authors note. That decline, though, has been steeper for men than women, they say.

Smoking behavior trends

Among both men and women, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the US, according to the American Cancer Society. About 80% of the total 154,000 deaths from lung cancer each year is due to smoking cigarettes.
Read on: Younger American women more likely to get lung cancer than men – CNN

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